Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Cast Iron Skillet Handle Covers



I obviously met my tentative goal of finishing at least two projects this week!  Not only did I crochet stuff, but I wrote a pattern as well!  Phew, I'm all worn out!

We are big cast iron users here at the Langlitz household.  Every day, we use cast iron at least once.  And you would think that I would remember that when cast iron heats up, it heats the whole pan.  Including the handle.  Alas, at least once a week, I forget.  And it can be a painful sort of forgetting. 

So I finally got around to doing something about it.  And, I figure there are other scatterbrained people like me who don't remember that things on top of fire get hot, so I wrote up this very simple pattern to share with you.




Materials:
Worsted weight cotton yarn (I used Sugar 'n Cream)
G (4mm) Hook
Tapestry needle for weaving ends

NOTES:  I recommend weaving in the tail from the foundation chain before you get to round 7.  After that, it's very hard to do.  Also, please don't use acrylic yarn...as with all plastics, it will melt.  Additionally, this cover is for stovetop use, please don't leave it on a pan that is going in the oven.

Ch6

Round 1.  Sc 5, rotate your work clockwise and sc 5 across, working in the free loop of each chain from the foundation row.  (10 sts)

Round 2.  Inc in first st, sc in next 3, inc* to the end (14 sts)

Round 3. Inc in first st, sc in next 5, inc* to the end (18 sts)

Rounds 4 and 5.  Sc in each sc around

Round 6.  Sc 4, dec, sc7 ,dec, sc3 (16)

Rounds 7 thru 20.  Sc in each sc around

Round 21. Reverse single crochet in each stitch.

Tie off and weave in your ends!  If you don't like the RSC border, you can always leave it plain or add something like a simple picot edging.



28 comments:

  1. Oh my gosh - what an excellent idea. I'm getting right on this. Thanks for sharing!!!

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  2. Omgoodness love it... thanks for sharing... Have youever used double yarns to make a thicker one to prevent heat from coming through?

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  3. Hi Brandy! I never even considered using yarn held doubled, that's an excellent idea! Of course, if one was to do that, the pattern might need to be adjusted a little bit to ensure that the cover still fits on the handle :)

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  4. Hi Brandy!

    Thanks for the handle holders pattern!

    One strand is fine when it's tight enough...I had to change from "G" to "F" as I crochet on the loose side.

    Martha

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  5. Thank you for copying my cast iron crocheted handles. Original design can be found at rusticfarmliving.blogspot.com this is violating copyright laws.

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    1. Pamela,

      I'm very confused about your accusation. The only cast iron handle cover that I can see on your blog is knit and was published a month after my crochet pattern. If you have a *crochet* pattern with cast iron handle covers, please link me to it.

      Rose

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    2. Pamela,

      I am new to crocheting and when I saw your seemingly rather snide comment, I also looked at your blogspot and could not find the pattern of which you speak. I planned to share this pattern with a friend who is also crocheting, however, I would like to give credit where credit is due. A direct link would be much appreciated, although, with the catty way you made your comment to Rose, I may not use the pattern at all, as your blogspot seemed to be more about sharing knowledge rather than taking credit for your so-called "original" concepts and methods. I rather enjoy sharing creativity and organic methods of living. I prefer an eco-friendly lifestyle and I like sharing the ideas and methods I have picked up with others as a method of living healthier and helping others to be more self-sustaining. I do not care about receiving credit for anything. I merely try to spread knowledge to as many people as possible.

      Also, I saw that you request that people ask permission to use your photos. Do you also require people to ask permission before using or sharing the patterns you display on your blogspot? As for copywright infringement, unless you have filed a copywright registration with the US Copywright Office, then you cannot make claims regarding the law. Also, you should know, most patterns, be it sewing, knitting, crocheting or even for construction, are not copywrightable. This has been true since 1929. If you feel your design is original, you may apply for a patent, which would aid in protecting your claim to a design or pattern. I got a good bit of information from
      http://www.tabberone.com/Trademarks/CopyrightLaw/Patterns.shtml
      From there, I was able to look up the court cases and research the Copywright laws via the US Copywright Office website.

      I do not mean to seem disbelieving, Pamela. But your comment seems bullying and Rose and you should both know the facts regarding copywrighting patterns and what the law will or will not uphold.

      Melanie

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    3. Melanie,

      I can assure you that I (Rose) created this pattern on my own, sitting at home with yarn, hook, and skillet in front of me to make sure it was going to fit. I would never, *never* steal another person's pattern!

      I have one simple correction to offer when it comes to pattern copyrighting: Patterns can be protected by copyright...but it is the written words that comprise the pattern that are protected and not the method or finished project. Copyright (in the sense of patterns) is simply to protect an author's written work from being duplicated exactly and sold. I have learned a bit about it since I wrote my book, when I stumbled upon patterns that were very similar to mine (exact stitches/count, etc) but were presented differently enough that there was nothing I could legally do about it.

      Copyright can be a confusing area, but there are lots of great threads discussing it in relation to patterns in the Ravlery forums!

      Rose

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    4. I think this whole mess with copyright over this idea is kinda silly, heaps of people would have thought of a similar if not the same solution for this universal problem, I myself had this thought after I brought my first cast iron pan and of course being so use to the non-stick variety with the non hot handles grabbed the handle after beginning seasoning it for the first time *ouch* and I knew I would keep doing it out of habit and as wool is good for hot things as it resists fire so its a natural choice that anyone who knits or crochet would pick so I wouldn't be surprise if 1000s of people have done this but never posted it or have posted it years ago or maybe even in their own languages cause lets face the fact every country uses cast iron and would have this problem.

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    5. Agreed. I made my own pattern years ago when I first got my cast iron set. Pam is probably just a troll.

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  6. I am so glad a came upon this pattern! I always put my iron skillet in the oven with a little butter or pam in it to get good and hot while I mix up my cornbread...(that makes it golden brown and adds a little crispiness to the bottom of the bread). Anyway, my husband took the 400 degree skillet out of the oven, sat it on the stove so I could pour the batter in, and my brain just automatically assumed...EMPTY SKILLET = NOT HOT, and I just grabbed the thing by the handle and picked it up....of course, realizing I have a ceramic top stove...if I drop it...there goes by cooktop...so I'm standing there half screaming and throwing in some four letter words, I finally spun around and threw it in the kitchen sink! I got blistered...but the Hubby and my two daughters (10 & 4), took over finishing dinner and cleaned the kitchen for me! :-O

    Raise your HAND if YOU E V E R did such a thing. It wasn't my 1st time and I'm positive it's not the LAST! Haha...

    ~~~~~Kellie raising her hand~~~~

    Wow...just saw the post from Pamela. So sorry that someone would make such an accusation over a skillet handle cover! I could see if this would be some extravagant sweater, shaw or made with some kind of fantastic new stitch or technique that NO ONE has ever seen before...but...PAMELA....it's a SKILLET HANDLE COVER! I could understand if you were making a million off of this, but it's a pattern almost any one that has been crocheting for many years could figure out. I thought about making sometning after I was burned the other night, I just so happen to stumble on this great pattern here. Think of it like this "BRILLIANT MINDS THINK ALIKE"

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    1. Blistered hands = no fun! I hope you heal quickly :)

      When I make cornbread, I do it the same way! It really does make a difference, doesn't it?

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    2. Kellie, I was always taught to put oil in the iron skillet and stick it in the oven, then when hot, take it out and put in the cornbread. Probably incredibly dangerous, too. But, that's how my great-great-grandmother did it and so everyone else down the line did as well. (There were 16 kids so I've got family brimming at the seams.) I always have to be so careful with that skillet of hot oil. Once you take it out of the oven, you're supposed to pour it into the cornbread and mix it again. Cooking can be very dangerous!

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  7. Anonymous, I assure you that as soon as an item is written it is now under copyright protection. HOWEVER, I really do not think this particular item is an infringement. The other version is knit as a flat piece & seamed, while this one is crochet in the round without seams. Ideas cannot be copy righted.

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  8. Great design, I love the look of the rsc in the last row. I just inherited my grandmothers skillets and have quickly discovered how hot the handles quick so I want to make some of these. Question about round 1: after the ch 6 do you join into a round? And could you explain what you mean by rotate clockwise?

    Thanks,
    Ed

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    1. So what you want to do is make your ch6 (this is your foundation chain), then work 5 sc into it as you normally would. Then you will rotate your work to work 5 more sc into the free loops on the opposite side of your foundation chain. After this you will be working in the round, but you never join. If would be helpful to place a stitch marker in the first stitch of each row (moving it up as you go along).

      Let me know if you need more clarification!

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  9. Thanks for the pattern! Just finished making one and will definitely be making more for myself and some for gifts.

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  10. To all, but especially Rose and Pamela. My son made me a handle cover for my cast iron skillets about 5 years ago. They look very much like yours but he just did it from fitting it to the handle. He has made several things this way and just makes them shaped the way he wantts by trial and error. I would think something as simple as this design or pattern would be very hard to patten since most all cast Iron skillet handles are pretty much the same and covers would end up looking pretty much alike. Just my thought on the subject! Lets just crochet and enjoy and not worry about who did what and when!

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  11. Thank you so much for sharing this pattern. I used cast iron daily, and I too on occasion forget that the handle gets hot. These will be very useful in our kitchen. :)

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  12. ive made the same and w/o a pattern anyway!!

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  13. I'm so excited about this! I didn't think you could get away with knitting/crocheting a cast-iron skillet handle cover. Coolio.

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  14. What is, and how do you reverse single crochet? I'm excited to make these as gifts! Perfect timing.

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    1. Reverse single crochet is exactly that...working single crochet stitches backwards (from left to right) It makes a nice firm border at the opening of the handle cover. There are lots of tutorials and videos out there on how to do it. Here is one: http://www.anniescatalog.com/crochet/content.html?content_id=17

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  15. I've made a similar cast-iron skillet handle cover using cotton t-yarn. Just make sure your yarn does NOT have acrylic (or other man-made fiber) in it or it will melt and burn you!

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  16. Do you allow people to make things to sell from your patterns? I just wanted to make sure before I made these for anyone but myself. Thank you!

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    1. Yes, of course please feel free to sell your finished projects!

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    2. Thank you so much!!

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  17. Great minds think alike. I created almost exactly this same pattern years ago.
    http://cherokeecampfiregirl.deviantart.com/art/Cast-Iron-Skillet-Handle-Cover-127363021

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